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The lute in the Dutch golden age

by Jan W.J. Burgers
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
Release Date: 2015-12-15
Genre: History
Pages: 264 pages
ISBN 13: 904851939X
ISBN 10: 9789048519392
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

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Synopsis : The lute in the Dutch golden age written by Jan W.J. Burgers, published by Amsterdam University Press which was released on 2015-12-15. Download The lute in the Dutch golden age Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. This richly illustrated book is the first to showcase famous and obscure lutenists, professional musicians and amateurs, the lute music in books and manuscripts, the lute makers and the international lute trade, while also exploring the ... -- The lutes cultural impact throughout the Dutch Golden Age can be compared to that of the piano in the 19th century. It was the universal instrument for solo music-making, as well as in ensembles and to accompany singers, mainly associated with the social elite - the aristocracy and the prosperous burghers. This richly illustrated book is the first to showcase famous and obscure lutenists, professional musicians and amateurs, the lute music in books and manuscripts, the lute makers and the international lute trade, while also exploring the place of the instrument in the Dutch literature and art of the period.

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The lute in the Dutch golden age
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Jan W.J. Burgers
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-15 - Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

The lutes cultural impact throughout the Dutch Golden Age can be compared to that of the piano in the 19th century. It was the universal instrument for solo music-making, as well as in ensembles and to accompany singers, mainly associated with the social elite - the aristocracy and the prosperous burghers. This richly illustrated book is the first to showcase famous and obscure lutenists, professional musicians and amateurs, the lute music in books and manuscripts, the lute makers and the international lute trade, while also exploring the place of the instrument in the Dutch literature and art of the period.
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The lute played a central role in the rich musical culture of the seventeenth-century ‘Golden Age’ of the Dutch Republic. Like the piano in the nineteenth century, the lute was not just a popular instrument for solo music making, but was also used widely in ensembles and to accompany singers. Though mainly an instrument of the social elite and the aristocracy, it was also played by the numerous and prosperous burgher class. The first part of the book deals with psalm settings for the lute; the way professional lutenists coped with the harsh rules of the free market; Leiden as a veritable international lute centre; and the different types of lutes that can be reconstructed on the basis of the Dutch paintings of the period. The second part of the book is dedicated to Constantijn Huygens (1596–1687), the well-known poet and statesman, and avid player of, and composer for, the lute. The third and final section deals with Dutch sources of lute music, printed as well as those in manuscript. Taken together, this volume provides a broad and many-layered overview of the lute in the seventeenth century. Collectively, the articles will further the reader’s understanding of the lute in its social and cultural context, not only in the Netherlands, but also on the wider European canvas.
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