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Russia s Greatest Enemy

by Charlotte Alston
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date: 2007-03-28
Genre: History
Pages: 278 pages
ISBN 13: 0857716581
ISBN 10: 9780857716583
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

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Synopsis : Russia s Greatest Enemy written by Charlotte Alston, published by Bloomsbury Publishing which was released on 2007-03-28. Download Russia s Greatest Enemy Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. DILLON, E. J., The Eclipse of Russia (1918). _____ Count Leo Tolstoy: A New Portrait (London 1934). DUKES, Paul, The Story of 'ST 25' (London 1938). DURLAND, Kellogg, The Red Reign – the true story of an adventurous year in Russia (New ... -- A remarkably talented linguist, foreign correspondant in Russia from 1904-1921 and Foreign Editor for 'The Times', 'Russia's Greatest Enemy?' traces the fascinating life and career of Harold Williams. This quiet and modest New Zealander played a central role in informing and influencing British opinion on Russia from the twilight of the Tsars, through War and Revolution, to the rise of the Soviet Union. The career of this keen Russophile and fierce opponent of Bolshevism illuminates the pre-World War One movement towards rapprochement with the Tsar, as well as the drive for intervention and isolation in the Soviet period. In this fascinating study Charlotte Alston explores the role of Williams as the interpreter of Russia to the British and the British to Russia in this turbulent period in the history of both countries Introduction 1. New Zealand, 1876-1900 2. Journalism, 1900-1914 3. Britain, Russia, War and Revolution, 1907-1917 4. From Revolution to Intervention, 1917-1921 5. The Times, 1921-1928 Conclusion Bibliography

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Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-03-28 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

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